Novak Djokovic

Men’s Tennis Association Career Overview

Novak Djokovic

Novak Djokovic was born in Belgrade on May 22, 1987, and is a Serbian national. Many experts believe him to be one of the greatest players of all time, and his haul of six Grand Slams would be even more remarkable if not for the presence of fellow greats Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal. At present, Djokovic just needs the French Open to complete a career Grand Slam, and he has also won a bronze medal at the 2008 Olympic Games.

Early Career

Like many future stars, Djokovic began playing tennis from an early age and was spotted when he was 6 years old by Jelena Gencic, a Yugoslav tennis player. She worked with him until age 12, when he moved to Germany. He began playing international tennis at the age of 14, and his professional tennis career began in 2003 primarily in the Futures and Challenger tournaments. He did not play his first Grand Slam event until 2005, and it was an unhappy experience, as he lost to Marat Safin (the eventual winner) in the first round.

Rise to Prominence

It didn’t take long for Djokovic to find his feet in the professional ranks, however, and by the end of 2006, he was ranked in the world’s top 40 players, having reached the quarterfinal of the French Open. By the end of 2007, he was in the world’s top 10, having reached the U.S. Open final only to lose to Roger Federer. Yet this only served to make Djokovic more determined, and he broke his Grand Slam duck in the very next event at the 2008 Australian Open.

Although he was not to win another Grand Slam until 2011, Djokovic enjoyed great success and reached 10 finals in 2009, when he claimed five titles. 2010 was another stellar season, but in the following year, Djokovic not only became the world’s Number 1 star but also emerged as one of the best tennis players of his generation. He won the Australian Open, Wimbledon, and the French Open titles along with five ATP World Tour Masters 1000 titles, and he defeated Nadal and Federer on multiple occasions.

Cementing His Status

Injury marred the end of his incredible 2011 season, but Djokovic stormed back with his third Australian Open title and had an opportunity to hold all four slams at once before losing to Nadal in the 2012 French Open final. Djokovic briefly lost his Number 1 status but regained it by the end of the season and won his fourth Australian Open title in 2013, which was his sixth Grand Slam overall. He was disappointed to lose the final at Wimbledon but did have the distinction of reaching 100 weeks at Number 1. His incredible Australian Open streak came to an end at the hands of Stan Wawrinka, but Djokovic has since won the 2014 Sony Open tennis tournament.

Personal Life

He is nicknamed “Djoker” because of his pleasant personality and willingness to appear on numerous chat shows on television. Djokovic is known as an extrovert and can also speak several languages, so he is deemed an ideal ambassador for the sport. He has been seen performing amusing impersonations of fellow male and female players and is also a philanthropist. After winning the 2014 Rome Masters, for example, he gave the $500,000 prize money to victims of the recent southeast European floods.
Djokovic still seems to have plenty of miles on the clock and is likely to remain a fixture at the top of the world rankings for many years to come. At the time of writing, he is ranked Number 2 in the world.

Novak Djokovic Tennis News & Updates

Wimbledon 2013 Wrap-Up

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Blog, Novak Djokovic, Professional Players, Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams, The Game of Tennis, World Tennis Tournaments | 0 comments

Wimbledon 2013 Wrap-Up

The 2013 edition of Wimbledon, one of the four Grand Slam events on the calendar, took place in London, England from June 24th through July 7th. Roger Federer was the defending men’s champion, while Serena Williams was the red hot favorite to retain the women’s title. Meanwhile, Andy Murray of Scotland was the British hopeful and carried the burden of a nation on his shoulders. It was to be two weeks of drama, action, and plenty of surprises along the way. Men’s Singles Although Rafael Nadal is arguably the greatest clay court player of all time, he is less invincible on grass, but no one expected his extraordinary first round defeat at the hands of Steve Darcis. Unfortunately, Darcis was one of an unusually large number of players that was forced to later withdraw due to injury. The second round held another massive upset with Federer knocked out by #116 ranked Sergiy Stakhovsky. For the first time in 11 years, neither Nadal nor Federer would be in the final. This opened the way for Andy Murray to become the first British male player to win the tournament since Fred Perry in 1936. In the quarter-finals, he came from two sets down to defeat Fernando Verdasco in one of the tournament’s best matches. He reached the final and faced an old adversary Novak Djokovic, the world ranked #1. Murray seemed to thrive on the pressure and produced an amazing performance to take the title 6-4, 7-5, 6-4. Women’s Singles #5 seeded Sara Errani was the high profile first round casualty, while the rest of the seeds tumbled at an incredible rate. Indeed, half of the top 16 ranked players were eliminated in the first or second round; however, no one saw the biggest shock of the tournament coming. Serena Williams looked unstoppable until she met Sabine Lisicki in the fourth round and was beaten in three sets. On the other side of the draw, #15 seed Marion Bartoli was making good progress and once Williams was defeated, the entire tournament seemed to open up for the rest of the players. Bartoli was simply exceptional as she didn’t drop a set in the entire tournament. In the final, Lisicki seemed overwhelmed by the occasion and was easily beaten 6-1, 6-4 by the jubilant Bartoli. Doubles You will not be surprised to learn that the Bryan brothers, Bob and Mike, were the immoveable objects in the men’s doubles as they beat Marcelo Melo and Ivan Dodig in the final. It was their 9th title of the year and 3rd Grand Slam of 2013. They are the first duo ever to be holders of all four Grand Slams and the Olympic title at the same time. Now they are aiming for a calendar year slam to complete a record breaking season. Unheralded Peng Shuai and Hsieh Su-Wei won the women’s title and it was the first Grand Slam for either woman. They defeated Australian duo Casey Dellacqua and Ashleigh Barty 7-6, 6-1. It was a memorable event with upsets, great tennis, and a national hero being made. Here’s hoping that the 2014 Wimbledon championships are equally exciting! Image license #1: Creative Commons (view source) Image license #2: Creative Commons (view source) Image license #3: Creative Commons (view source) Image license #4: Creative Commons...

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10 things learned from Wimbledon 2013

Posted by on Jul 9, 2013 in Blog, Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal | 0 comments

10 things learned from Wimbledon 2013

By Dan Imhoff From the very first Monday to the very last Sunday, The Championships 2013 were quite unlike any other. Here are 10 things that Wimbledon.com will remember… 1. Murray becomes the first British man to win Wimbledon in shortsThe long, long wait is over. There was collective disbelief, shock and awe as Great Britain toasted their first home champion since the long-trouser-wearing Fred Perry 77 years ago. “He’s someone I’ve never met, but he’s quite relevant to my career,” Murray said of Perry after ending the drought. On a day when the thermometer hovered around 30 and the pressure of playing another Wimbledon final before a raucous home crowd probably made it feel closer to 50 degrees, the Scot withstood a last-minute fightback to gets his hands on the golden cup. 2. It’s no longer a given Djokovic will win a setIt’s just over three years since Novak Djokovic last lost a Grand Slam match in straight sets. That was in the semi-finals at Wimbledon 2010 and his conqueror on that day was Czech Tomas Berdych. He had taken at least a set in his past 80 Grand Slam matches and his loss to Murray in the 2013 final marked the first time the Serbian No.1 had lost a slam final in straight sets. 3. Federer and Nadal no longer a shoe-inThe chances of ever seeing a Roger Federer v Rafael Nadal final at Wimbledon let alone at any of the other Slams now looks slim. The big four in the men’s game have reached the business end of the majors with such regularity in recent years there is an expectancy they will be there when it counts. When the Spaniard exited at the first hurdle to unheralded Belgian Steve Darcis and Federer was humbled one round later by Sergiy Stakhovsky, pundits rightly began to question whether the great Federer-Nadal era was over. 4. Del Potro a force to be reckoned with again at the SlamsThe big Argentine won a new legion of fans after his semi-final heroics in pushing Djokovic to five sets in the longest Wimbledon semi-final ever played. As a talented big-swinging 20-year-old he stunned Nadal and Federer at the 2009 US Open final before wrist surgery derailed his rise. This was his first outing at the semi-final level since then and his first beyond the fourth round on the grass. “What I experienced in there (on Centre Court) was special, it had been a long time since I had played like that,” he said. 5. Bryan brothers find a rare record they hadn’t brokenThe Bryan twins’ third Wimbledon doubles crown took on extra significance as they became the first pair to complete a non-calendar-year Golden Grand Slam in the Open era (holding all four majors and Olympic gold simultaneously). “I didn’t think anything could feel as sweet as the gold medal, but this one just feels like there’s a cap, a lid, or a ribbon around our career,” Mike Bryan said. 6. Bernard Tomic’s loss was Marion Bartoli’s gainUntil five weeks ago, most people wouldn’t have known who Thomas Drouet was. But after the former hitting partner for Bernard Tomic was allegedly assaulted by Bernie’s dad, John, outside a Madrid hotel, the Frenchman made the improbable switch to Marion Bartoil’s camp. He is...

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French Open 2013

Posted by on Jun 18, 2013 in Blog, Novak Djokovic, Professional Players, Rafael Nadal, Serena Williams | 0 comments

French Open 2013

The French Open is one of the four Grand Slam tournaments that take place during the year. It is held in Paris and is also known as ‘Roland Garros’ after the famous French aviator. The 2013 event was the 112th edition of the tournament and the winners of the men’s and women’s titles earned 1.5 million euros which is a record amount for the event, though the overall prize fund is the lowest of the four Grand Slams! In the men’s event, Rafael Nadal was big favorite, but would face competition from his usual rivals while Serena Williams was expected to win the women’s event. Men’s Singles & Doubles While there were a handful of shocks in the tournament, the cream rose to the top with the #6 seed the lowest ranked semi-finalist. #5 seed Tomas Berdych was a high profile first round casualty, as he succumbed to Gael Monfils in a thrilling five set match. Janko Tipsarevic was the only other member of the top 8 seeds to be on the end of a real upset, as he was dumped out in round three. Rafael Nadal was ominously crushing his opposition until he met world #1 Novak Djokovic in the semi-final and the result was a classic five set match that ended with a 9-7 final set victory for Nadal. He faced fellow Spaniard and #4 seed David Ferrer in the final and easily won in straight sets to claim his 8th French Open title. In the men’s doubles, the great Bryan brothers, Bob and Mike, won the final by defeating Nicolas Mahut and Michael Llodra 6-4, 4-6, 7-6 to earn their first multiple slam set. Women’s Singles & Doubles The women’s singles tournament was very similar to the men’s event, in that the #5 seed was the lowest semi-finalist. Indeed, Svetlana Kuznetsova was the only unseeded quarter-finalist and gave Serena Williams a tough match before losing in three sets. As it transpired, it was to be the only set that the all-conquering Williams lost in the entire tournament, as she swept through opponents and displayed the ruthlessness that has been a notable part of her game in the last 12 months. The #2 seed Maria Sharapova opposed Williams in the final but was comfortably defeated 6-4, 6-4 as Williams won only her second French Open title, over a decade after her first. The women’s doubles followed the pattern of the seeded players following the form book, as the top 4 seeds made up the semi-finalists, though there was a minor surprise in the final. Number 4 seeds Ekaterina Makarova and Elena Vesnina defeated #1 seeds Roberta Vinci and Sara Errani 7-5, 6-2, as the latter failed to retain their French Open title. It is believed that the prize money for the French Open will increase by a further 10 million euros within the next three years! Champions Rafael Nadal and Serena Williams will march on to Wimbledon full of confidence and will be hard to stop. While Nadal will face tough competition, it is difficult to see anyone preventing the juggernaut that is Serena Williams from winning yet another tournament. Image license #1: Creative Commons (view source) Image license #2: Creative Commons (view...

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