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Academy We pride ourselves on helping you find the racket and string set up that compliments your game.  We carry more than 20 demo rackets and more than 95 strings from different companies.  We also provide weight/balance customization along with grip build ups and grommet replacement. 

With our 24 hour guarantee* and our ability to accomplish emergency stringing needs much quicker you can be comfortable with our accurate and quick service. If your racket doesn’t feel better after we string it bring it back and we will restring it for free!

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How to Hit Clean & Effective Forehand Shots in Tennis

Posted by on Jul 29, 2013 in Blog, Tennis Tips & Advice, Videos | 0 comments

How to Hit Clean & Effective Forehand Shots in Tennis

At Basha Tennis, we have the ability to teach players of any level how to improve their game. If you are a talented player, we can help you make that important step towards the upper echelons of the game. If you are a raw beginner, we will quickly bring you up to speed and infuse you with a genuine love of the sport of tennis. Today, we are going to focus on tennis forehand tips that allow you to hit the ball cleanly and achieve a better level of control.   Basha Tennis Video: How to Perform the Forehand Shot in Tennis   Adding Power When you look at a brilliant player like Roger Federer and the way he uses a forehand, it all seems very complex. While it takes practice to gain anything near the level of precision a top level player has, even an advanced forehand can be broken up into simpler elements that can be taught. To generate power, you must focus on rotation and extension of the arm. You rotate your hips and shoulders during the first part of the swing and then move the arm forward during the latter part of the swing and follow through. Effective Striking It is essential to have proper orientation of the racket when looking to hit the ball. Use a tight grip, as this reduces the chances of racket rotation and loose shots. Ensure that you keep the racket face straight and open. Loop the racket and strike the ball with a downward motion in order to produce a powerful shot that will speed past your opponent. You must use the weight of your entire body to generate the kind of force that will win the point. Rotate your upper body into the ball as you are striking it for additional power. A proper follow through is also essential, as it enables you to keep your balance after playing the initial shot and helps you get into a good position for the next stroke. If you don’t follow through correctly, you will chop your shots, greatly reducing their power. Popular Forehand Strokes There is no single forehand stroke that is the right choice for every occasion. This is why professionals have an array of forehand strokes in their locker, which require different techniques and are to be used for different situations. Reverse Forehand – This involves hitting the ball with an upward motion initially. The follow through involves allowing the racket head to move forward towards the ball, slightly before moving upwards, and then backwards in the opposite direction to the hit. This is an advanced technique that helps the player reduce errors. Downward Finish – Hit the ball with force when it is at waist height, before following through across the body and down to the hip on the opposite side of your body to where you struck the ball. Out-Front Finish – This involves allowing the racket head to go straight out without a twist. It is the easiest of the trio of strokes to learn and helps control the direction of shots. Hopefully, the information above will help you generate more power, accuracy, and consistency into your forehand drives. Image license: Full length of a man playing tennis – Shutterstock (view...

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The Two-Handed Backhand is Good for Beginners

Posted by on Jul 29, 2013 in Blog, Tennis Tips & Advice, Videos | 0 comments

The Two-Handed Backhand is Good for Beginners

Although you can hit a backhanded shot in tennis with one hand, some professionals and high-level amateurs prefer to use two hands as it feels more comfortable. Although the one-handed and two-handed backhand strokes look different to each other, the mechanics of both are similar in nature. Basha Tennis Video: How to Perform the backhand Shot in Tennis The one-handed backhand shot is for players that enjoy variety and risk and have a penchant for creative shots. It is really only a stroke for skilled players with reasonable arm strength. The two-handed stroke is better when it comes to consistency and stamina, plus it is the ideal choice for beginners who have yet to develop the coordination or forearm strength to accurately play the one-hand version. Advantages of the Two-Handed Backhand As we mentioned above, using two hands for the backhand stroke carries plenty of advantages for beginners including: Power – You simply can’t develop any real power using just one hand without years of practice and an increase in strength. Hold the racket in one hand using a backhand grip and swing it. Be confident, as the tennis ball is coming toward you at over 100 miles per hour. Two hands are steadier and allow for greater control of shots. Practicality – A two-handed backhand enables you to prepare quickly and in tennis, a fraction of a second makes all the difference. With quick rotation into the ball and a short backswing, you can return the ball with interest. Consistency – The extra strength you have using two hands allows you to remain stable and follow through on each shot. This allows for a certain level of consistency, as you can hit the same kind of shot over and over again. If you are a player with excellent conditioning, the two-handed backhand is a great weapon. The reliability and ease of the stroke means you can engage in long baseline rallies and also force your opponents into making mistakes. Disadvantages Of course it is not the ‘perfect’ stroke, otherwise every player would only approach their shots with the backhand! Here are some disadvantages: Rigid – It is very hard to hit an accurate shot on the move with a two-handed grip. While it is okay for baseline rallies, it is less effective when trying to return shots hit out wide. Reach – Your range is significantly reduced so if shots are hit low and away from your backhand, retrieving in this situation is difficult. Volleys – It is not the best option for ‘serve and volley’ players. Legends such as Pete Sampras and John McEnroe who had great volleying skills used the one-handed backhand. Lack of Variation – The two-handed backhand is a basic shot, so you should avoid trying anything fancy or innovative. For...

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How to Serve the Ball in Tennis

Posted by on Jul 29, 2013 in Blog, Tennis Tips & Advice, Videos | 0 comments

How to Serve the Ball in Tennis

While there is certainly nothing wrong with simply enjoying the fun of hitting the ball and getting in a great workout, your enjoyment of tennis will escalate if you learn how to serve efficiently. Continue reading to learn the basics of the serve in tennis. This information is for beginners, but could someday enable you to serve like Roger Federer or Novak Djokovic! For more advanced instruction in Phoenix’s East Valley, you should consider taking tennis lessons at Basha Tennis. Click here for an overview of the adult and kid’s training sessions that we offer. Basha Tennis Video: How to Perform a Tennis Serve Equipment This is obvious, a tennis racket, some tennis balls, and a practice court is all you need. It’s a good idea to have a partner though, as you at least have someone to help you return the balls! Bear in mind that a racket’s tension and strings have a major impact on your serve speed. Again, this is something you should only worry about later down the road. Just use a high quality racket and balls and you’ll be fine. Gripping the Racket There are actually a number of different grips you can use including Continental, Eastern Forehand, Semi-Western Forehand, Western Forehand, Eastern Backhand, Extreme Eastern, and Two-Handed Backhand! For the purpose of serving, you will use the Continental grip, which involves placing your index finger’s base knuckle on Bevel no.1 (right-handed) or Bevel no.4 if you’re left-handed. You should always hold the racket at the base of the handle to increase your reach. Where To Stand Stand behind the baseline at the back of the court and near the center. You will see the baseline half-mark so position yourself close to it. When you serve, the ball needs to bounce within the service box on your opponent’s side of the court. The service box is near the net, so it takes practice and skill to keep the ball within the box without hitting the net. Make sure your foot does not touch the baseline, or you will be penalized with a foot fault. Ball Toss The ball should be tossed to a reasonable height, at least above the top of the racket to give you time to swing and hit. Toss the ball directly in front of you and keep your arm straight. The ball should go straight into the air and land in your hand, if you were to keep your arm stretched. Swinging the Racket Your racket should be moving simultaneously with the ball. Raise the racket and begin to swing, the racket head should end up just behind your head when the ball has reached its peak trajectory. Swing the racket forward with power at this point and ensure your arm is straight at the point of contact. If you time it correctly, you should hit the ball with the middle of your racket. Follow Through After connecting with the ball, momentum should carry you forward into the court, which is why the toss should always be in front of you. By going forward after the swing, you should generate some power while also being ready to play your next shot after your opponent returns the serve. These are the basics and once you have mastered them, you can move...

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