Tennis Lessons and Child Behavior Improvement

Jan 31, 2013 by

Sports have the ability to improve a child’s physical state, mental state, emotional state and overall well-being. Just about all children at some point or another may go through a phase of concentration issues, low self-confidence issues and a variety of other problems. Luckily, there are ways to assist a child in overcoming these boundaries. One of the best ways is to find a physical outlet that can allow a child to learn a sport and participate in it.

Tennis to Improve Behavior

Tennis is a physical activity that has been proven to aid children who have behavior issues and those who’ve been diagnosed with ADHD.

The reason that tennis lessons have become a popular choice for child behavior improvement is because of the various actions and reactions that comprise the game. Not only can tennis help children who have issues concentrating and learning, but it can also help children become more physically active. Currently, a great deal of research proves that tennis is a valuable tool for any child who has Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). Over time, engaging in tennis lessons contributes to a child’s ability to control the attention span of his or her mind.

Furthermore, with the rising number of obese children, tennis lessons are a fun way for children to become active while learning discipline, concentration and self-control.

Physical & Mental Benefits to Playing Tennis

Tennis is a game that utilizes both the mind and the body, as it is essential that a player is able to seek out the target (the ball) and deliver the proper hit with his or her tool (the racket). Take the game of chess for example; the mind seeks out the next best move to make and the move must be one that can throw the opponent off. By using strategy the opponent can be defeated, which is very similar to tennis.

During tennis a child will be taught by his or her instructor how to find a mind and body connection with the ball. Concentration is key, because in order to hit the ball with the racket, one must be able to keep an eye on the ball. This is exactly why tennis has become so popular for children with ADHD as it requires discipline and concentration. Beginning tennis lessons is exciting for a child, as the game is one that is enjoyable, and therefore it has a greater potential to be successful.

Skills that Improve with Playing Tennis

Since tennis is a game of action and reaction it can improve a child’s learning skills, as an instructor uses both words and visualization to deliver the fundamentals of the game. While some children may be better learners when visual cues are used, others can pick up on lessons through words. Yet by receiving verbal directions, seeing directions and ultimately putting these directions into action, children can become accustomed to a number of learning methods. This can improve their school performance and is a good choice for those that may have learning hindrances.

In addition to this, a child can learn self-discipline through the lessons as he or she trains their mental and physical self to apply what is learned to the game.

Tennis Brings Self-Confidence to Players

Most importantly, tennis lessons can improve children’s self-confidence levels. As they improve at the sport, they will develop a greater sense of themselves. This will allow them to see that with practice and perseverance all things are possible in life. Not to mention, as they become more physically active they will improve their health, which will set good habits for the future. So, when looking to improve your child’s learning capabilities, discipline, concentration, self-confidence and health, tennis lessons are a stimulating way to improve any child’s future.

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